Skip to main content
Displaying 1 of 1
I am Malala : how one girl stood up for education and changed the world
2016
Availability
Map It
Annotations

Documents the educational pursuits of the Nobel Peace Prize nominee who became an international symbol of hope and inspiration when she challenged the traditions of her Pakistan community, offering insight into the influential role of her courageous father. - (Baker & Taylor)

"I Am Malala. This is my story. Malala Yousafzai was only ten years old when the Taliban took control of her region. They said music was a crime. They said women weren't allowed to go to the market. They said girls couldn't go to school. Raised in a once-peaceful area of Pakistan transformed by terrorism, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes. So she fought for her right to be educated. And on October 9, 2012, she nearly lost her life for the cause: She was shot point-blank while riding the bus on her way home from school. No one expected her to survive. Now Malala is an international symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest ever Nobel Peace Prize nominee. In this Young Readers Edition of her bestselling memoir, which includes exclusivephotos and material, we hear firsthand the remarkable story of a girl who knew from a young age that she wanted to change the world -- and did. Malala's powerful story will open your eyes to another world and will make you believe in hope, truth, miracles and the possibility that one person -- one young person -- can inspire change in her community and beyond. "-- - (Baker & Taylor)

The bestselling memoir by Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai.

I Am Malala. This is my story.

Malala Yousafzai was only ten years old when the Taliban took control of her region. They said music was a crime. They said women weren't allowed to go to the market. They said girls couldn't go to school.

Raised in a once-peaceful area of Pakistan transformed by terrorism, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes. So she fought for her right to be educated. And on October 9, 2012, she nearly lost her life for the cause: She was shot point-blank while riding the bus on her way home from school.

No one expected her to survive.

Now Malala is an international symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest ever Nobel Peace Prize winner. In this Young Readers Edition of her bestselling memoir, which has been reimagined specifically for a younger audience and includes exclusive photos and material, we hear firsthand the remarkable story of a girl who knew from a young age that she wanted to change the world -- and did.

Malala's powerful story will open your eyes to another world and will make you believe in hope, truth, miracles and the possibility that one person -- one young person -- can inspire change in her community and beyond. - (Grand Central Pub)

Author Biography

Malala Yousafzai, the educational campaigner from Swat Valley, Pakistan, became the youngest-ever winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, at age seventeen. Malala champions universal access to quality education through the Malala Fund (malala.org). - (Grand Central Pub)

Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

Booklist Reviews

The young reader's edition of Malala Yousafzai's 2013 memoir for adults loses none of its power in its transition to a new audience. At times earnest and somber, at others irreverent and playful, the 17-year-old details her experiences as an advocate for education in Pakistan—especially for women—both before and after she became a target of the Taliban. Although her efforts to attend school, and the subsequent attack she endured, make for a powerful story, Yousafzai writes just as vividly about her daily life as a child in Pakistan. As young readers draw parallels between their own lives and the everyday experiences of Yousafzai and her friends, they'll gain invaluable perspective on a country so often stigmatized by the media. Yousafzai's fresh, straightforward voice creates an easily read narrative that will introduce a slew of younger readers to both her story and her mission. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews

Young Readers Edition. Young education activist and Taliban victim Malala Yousafzai recounts her Pakistani childhood in this deftly adapted memoir. Domestic and academic tales illustrate her unusual maturity and resilience in the face of increasing Taliban threats. Yousafzai's moving narrative and engaging, sincere voice may provide an entryway to international awareness for middle-grade readers; a map and a thorough timeline provide additional political context. Glos.

Publishers Weekly Reviews

Adapted with McCormick (Never Fall Down) from the adult bestseller, this inspiring memoir by activist Yousafzai sketches her brave actions to champion education in Pakistan under the Taliban. Her father runs a school in the Swat Valley, where Malala proves an eager student; as the Taliban gains influence, she increasingly becomes an international spokesperson for girls' right to learn. The narrative begins with a prologue in which a Taliban gunman boards her school bus and asks, "Who is Malala?" The authors then offer insight into the cultural and political events leading up to the shooting that followed and Yousafzai's dramatic recovery. Yousafzai highlights the escalating tensions as the Taliban takes hold—including the strictures against girls attending school, the obliteration of Western influence, violence, and the eventual war—but also brings the universal to life as she quarrels with her brothers, treasures her best friend, and strives to earn top grades. A glossary, color photo inserts, and an extensive timeline help establish context. It's a searing and personal portrait of a young woman who dared to make a difference. Ages 10–up. (Aug.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC

PW Annex Reviews

Adapted with McCormick (Never Fall Down) from the adult bestseller, this inspiring memoir by activist Yousafzai sketches her brave actions to champion education in Pakistan under the Taliban. Her father runs a school in the Swat Valley, where Malala proves an eager student; as the Taliban gains influence, she increasingly becomes an international spokesperson for girls' right to learn. The narrative begins with a prologue in which a Taliban gunman boards her school bus and asks, "Who is Malala?" The authors then offer insight into the cultural and political events leading up to the shooting that followed and Yousafzai's dramatic recovery. Yousafzai highlights the escalating tensions as the Taliban takes hold—including the strictures against girls attending school, the obliteration of Western influence, violence, and the eventual war—but also brings the universal to life as she quarrels with her brothers, treasures her best friend, and strives to earn top grades. A glossary, color photo inserts, and an extensive timeline help establish context. It's a searing and personal portrait of a young woman who dared to make a difference. Ages 10–up. (Aug.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC

School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 6 Up—In this young readers edition of Yousafzai's best-selling memoir, the Nobel Peace Prize winner retells her experiences at home and at school and discusses the impact of the Taliban presence in Pakistan. Her strong voice and ideals come across on every page, emphasizing how her surroundings and supportive family helped her become the relevant figure she is today. Yousafzai highlights the importance of school and how it was the only space where she felt empowered. Although at times the transitions between personal accounts and historical background feel abrupt, Yousafzai effectively summarizes her story and her advocacy for girls' education, peace, and human rights. Above all, she stresses that she doesn't want to be known as the girl shot by the Taliban but rather as a young person who actively fought for education. A strong addition to social studies, history, and biography collections.—Sujei Lugo, Somerville Public Library, MA

[Page 134]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Table of Contents

Prologue 1(10)
Part One Before the Taliban
1 As Free as a Bird
11(10)
2 Dreams
21(4)
3 A Magic Pencil
25(4)
4 A Warning from God
29(3)
5 The First Direct Threat
32(7)
Part Two A Shadow over Our Valley
6 Radio Mullah
39(5)
7 The Taliban in Swat
44(8)
8 No One Is Safe
52(4)
9 Candy from the Sky
56(4)
10 2008: What Terrorism Feels Like
60(9)
Part Three Finding My Voice
11 A Chance to Speak
69(4)
12 A Schoolgirl's Diary
73(8)
13 Class Dismissed
81(5)
14 Secret School
86(4)
15 Peace?
90(6)
16 Displaced
96(8)
17 Home
104(3)
18 A Humble Request and a Strange Peace
107(4)
19 Good News at Last
111(6)
Part Four Targeted
20 A Death Threat against Me
117(3)
21 The Promise of Spring
120(3)
22 Omens
123(4)
23 A Day Like Any Other
127(6)
Part Five A New Life, Far from Home
24 A Place Called Birmingham
133(5)
25 Problems, Solutions
138(5)
26 A Hundred Questions
143(3)
27 Passing the Hours
146(5)
28 We Are All Here Now
151(6)
29 Filling In the Blanks
157(8)
30 Messages from Around the World
165(2)
31 A Bittersweet Day
167(5)
32 Miracles
172(4)
33 This New Place
176(6)
34 The One Thing We All Know
182(4)
35 Anniversary
186(3)
36 One Girl Among Many
189(6)
Epilogue: October 2015
195(18)
Acknowledgments
205(4)
Photo Credits
209(4)
Additional Information
Glossary
213(6)
A Time Line of Important Events
219(18)
A Note on the Malala Fund
237(2)
About the Authors
239

Librarian's View
Displaying 1 of 1