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The youngest marcher : the story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, a young civil rights activist
2017
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Presents the life of nine-year-old Audrey Faye Hendricks who became the youngest known child to be arrested for picketing against Birmingham segregation practices in 1963. - (Baker & Taylor)

An inspirational picture book portrait of 9-year-old Audrey Faye Hendricks describes how, in 1963 Alabama, she became the youngest known child to be arrested for participating in a civil rights protest, for which she was imprisoned for picketing against Birmingham segregation practices. By the author of We've Got a Job. Simultaneous eBook. - (Baker & Taylor)

Meet the youngest known child to be arrested for a civil rights protest in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963, in this moving picture book that proves you're never too little to make a difference.

Nine-year-old Audrey Faye Hendricks intended to go places and do things like anybody else.

So when she heard grown-ups talk about wiping out Birmingham's segregation laws, she spoke up. As she listened to the preacher's words, smooth as glass, she sat up tall. And when she heard the plan'picket those white stores! March to protest those unfair laws! Fill the jails!'she stepped right up and said, I'll do it! She was going to j-a-a-il!

Audrey Faye Hendricks was confident and bold and brave as can be, and hers is the remarkable and inspiring story of one child's role in the Civil Rights Movement. - (Simon and Schuster)

Author Biography

Cynthia Levinson was in high school when Audrey Faye Hendricks marched to jail, and she knows she would not have been as brave as Audrey. But when Cynthia met Audrey forty-five years later, she knew she had to write a book about her for young readers. She spent more than three years interviewing marchers and researching the events. Her book We've Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children's March tells the story for older readers. Cynthia has also written about social justice in Watch Out for Flying Kids: How Two Circuses, Two Countries, and Nine Kids Confront Conflict and Build Community. She and her husband divide their time between Austin, Texas, and Boston, Massachusetts.

Vanessa Brantley-Newton is a self-taught artist and has attended both FIT and SVA of New York, where she studied fashion and children's illustration. Vanessa is the illustrator of A Night Out with Mama by Quvenzhané Wallis, The Youngest Marcher by Cynthia Levinson, Presenting'tallulah by Tori Spelling, and Early Sunday Morning by Denene Millner, among others. She hopes that when people look at her work, it will make them feel happy in some way, or even reclaim a bit of their childhood. - (Simon and Schuster)

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Horn Book Guide Reviews

Levinson tells the true story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, the youngest participant in the 1963 Birmingham Children's March. The well-paced text captures a child's voice and presents time and place realistically. Brightly colored digital collages clearly depict both the hopeful spirit and the rawer emotions of one community involved in the civil rights struggle. An author's note provides additional background. Timeline. Bib. Copyright 2017 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews

Levinson tells the true story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, the youngest participant in the 1963 Birmingham Children's March. Growing up in Alabama, nine-year-old Audrey knows all about segregation as a way of life. And listening to the grownups talk at church, she hears hateful stories that make her squirm. When the visiting preacher--Martin Luther King Jr., known to Audrey's family as "Mike"--announces his plan for the congregation to fight segregation by marching and getting arrested, the adults demur. Then the idea for a Children's March is floated, and Audrey is eager to join in: "She was going to break a law and go to jail to help make things right." Levinson goes on to describe Audrey's week in jail, with its loneliness, bad food, boredom, and intimidation--it "was harder than she'd thought"--and her jubilation when she realizes that the Children's March has been a success. The well-paced text captures a child's voice and presents time and place realistically. Brightly colored digital collages clearly depict both the hopeful spirit and the rawer emotions of one community involved in the civil rights struggle; a double-page spread of Audrey curled up on a bare mattress in her jail cell is particularly effective. A timeline, sources, and recipe for "hot rolls baptized in butter" (Audrey's favorite food) are included; an author's note provides additional background. claudette s. mclinn Copyright 2017 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

Publishers Weekly Reviews

Levinson returns to the subject of We've Got a Job as she recounts, for a younger audience, the story of Audrey Faye Hendricks and her role in the 1963 Children's March in Birmingham, Ala. Moving briskly through events, Levinson explains how the young Hendricks was eager to stand up to segregation, marching alongside thousands of fellow students, who were subsequently arrested. Newton's bright, digitally assembled collages adeptly highlight the danger of the situation—grim cells, barbed-wire fences, children blasted with fire hoses—while emphasizing the power of the marchers' collective efforts to push back against injustice. Ages 5–10. Author's agent: Erin Murphy, Erin Murphy Literary. Illustrator's agent: Lori Nowicki, Painted Words. (Jan.) Copyright 2016 Publisher Weekly.

School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 4—Levinson's We've Got a Job followed nine-year-old Audrey Faye Hendricks and three other youths who were among the thousands of children and teens who marched for freedom in Birmingham, AL, in 1963. Here, she pulls from that material, including personal interviews, to highlight Hendricks's story for younger audiences, telling it from her subject's perspective. The author introduces the Hendricks family's frequent dinner guests, Mike, Fred, and Jim—the ministers Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Shuttlesworth, and James Bevel, respectively. She also describes the indignities of African American life in Alabama at the time. When Mike's campaign to protest segregation and "fill the jails" doesn't work, young Audrey eagerly volunteers for Jim's new idea—getting children to march. Digital collage illustrations show a young, pigtailed Audrey and her family mostly smiling and happy leading up to the march—she even brings a new board game to pass the time. Pictures and words combine to depict the discomfort of Hendricks's actual experience: loneliness, unpalatable food, angry white interrogators, and even solitary confinement. Like young Audrey, readers will be relieved when her weeklong sentence is up and she goes home to "hot rolls, baptized in butter," and the promise of a brighter future. VERDICT Simplified and sweetened, but still a significant portrayal of Audrey Faye Hendricks and the Children's March. For collections in need of history materials for the younger set.—Kathleen Isaacs, Children's Literature Specialist, Pasadena, MD. Copyright 2016 School Library Journal.

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