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I am Amelia Earhart
2014
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Presents the life of the first female pilot to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, who mysteriously disappeared in 1937 while attempting to fly around the world. - (Baker & Taylor)

The host of the History Channel's Brad Meltzer's Decoded and best-selling author of The Inner Circle presents an accessible introduction to the pioneering pilot that examines how her tenacity and bravery enabled history-making advances in aviation. - (Baker & Taylor)

We can all be heroes. That’s the inspiring message of this lively, collectible picture book biography series from New York Times bestselling author Brad Meltzer.
 
“Kids always search for heroes, so we might as well have a say in it,” Brad Meltzer realized, and so he envisioned this friendly, fun approach to biography – for his own kids, and for yours. Each book tells the story of one of America’s icons in an entertaining, conversational way that works well for the youngest nonfiction readers, those who aren’t quite ready for the Who Was series. Each book focuses on a particular character trait that made that role model heroic. For example, Amelia Earhart refused to accept no for an answer; she dared to do what no one had ever done before, and became the first woman to fly a plane all the way across the Atlantic Ocean. This book follows her from childhood to her first flying lessons and onward to her multi-record-breaking career as a pilot.
 
This engaging series is the perfect way to bring American history to life for young children, and to inspire them to strive and dream. - (Penguin Putnam)

Author Biography

Brad Meltzer is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of adult thrillers (including The Inner Circle and its recent sequel, The Fifth Assassin). His two nonfiction gift books, Heroes for My Son and Heroes for My Daughter were New York Times Bestsellers as well, and he has won the prestigious Eisner Award for his comic book work, Justice League of America. Brad is also the host of the History Channel TV show Brad Meltzer's Decoded. - (Penguin Putnam)

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Horn Book Guide Reviews

In these chatty, first-person-narrated biographies, entertainment value trumps historical rigor: Earhart says, "That was AWESOME!"; young Lincoln declares, "I'm gonna be on the penny someday"; and both subjects are depicted as children even after they become adults. The cartoony digital illustrations recall Calvin and Hobbes comics. Each small-trim book ends with words of wisdom from its subject and vintage images. [Review covers these Ordinary People Change the World titles: I Am Abraham Lincoln and I Am Amelia Earhart.]

Publishers Weekly Reviews

Thriller writer Meltzer, who also hosts the history-themed TV show Decoded, introduces groundbreaking historical figures in the Ordinary People Change the World series, which launches with this title and I Am Abraham Lincoln (a third book, I Am Rosa Parks, is scheduled for summer 2014). Beyond the underlying message that average people are capable of greatness, the conceit on which the series turns is that each famous protagonist is pictured as a child, even at the peak of his or her adult accomplishments and fame. Eliopoulos draws Earhart as an eager, try-anything kind of girl whose oversize head, stumpy limbs, and expressive reactions strongly evoke the work of Charles Schulz and Bill Watterson. Early scenes show Earhart getting her first taste of flight via a homemade roller coaster ("That was awesome!" shouts Amelia after her "un-ladylike" crash landing), before the book moves on to her record-setting feats of aviation. Anachronisms are embraced wholeheartedly, and moments of humor balance out the plainly stated message: "Whatever your dream is, chase it." Archival photos wrap up this entertaining and inspiring primer, though source notes are absent. Ages 5–8. (Jan.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 2—Imagine, if you will, two famous Americans whose childhood selves were strong and portentous of their future adult lives but whose bodies stayed small and childlike as they achieved their incredible feats. Meltzer has chosen to portray these iconic figures in this way, perhaps in the hopes that modern-day kids will more easily identify with them. Both narratives are told in first person, which raises doubts as to whether they could truly be called biographies. For example, Amelia Earhart recounts an incident in which she and her sister built a ramp off the side of a shed so they could ride a cart off the roof. Her brother comes along and asks, "Amelia, are you sure this is a good idea?" She replies, "This isn't a good idea. It's the BEST idea!" Such conversations and the lack of resources calls the books' informational value into question. On the other hand, they each talk about the character traits that made Earhart and Lincoln wonderful role models and determined in their life pursuits. The illustrations, while a bit odd, are also rather charming. Their comiclike nature and the brief, readable text will appeal to young readers. Adults who read these books with children will have plenty to discuss regarding the hard work, persistence, and determination each person showed, as long as it's clear that the books themselves are fictionalized.—Maggie Chase, Boise State University, ID

[Page 181]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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