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Qualityland
2020
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Welcome to QualityLand, the best country on Earth. Here, a universal ranking system determines the social advantages and career opportunities of every member of society. An automated matchmaking service knows the best partners for everyone and helps withthe break up when your ideal match (frequently) changes. And the foolproof algorithms of the biggest, most successful company in the world, TheShop, know what you want before you do and conveniently deliver to your doorstep before you even order it. In QualityCity, Peter Jobless is a machine scrapper who can't quite bring himself to destroy the imperfect machines sent his way, and has become the unwitting leader of a band of robotic misfits hidden in his home and workplace. One day, Peter receives a product from TheShop that he absolutely, positively knows he does not want, and which he decides, at great personal cost, to return. The only problem: doing so means proving the perfect algorithm of TheShop wrong, calling into question the very foundations ofQualityLand itself. Qualityland, Marc-Uwe Kling's first book to be translated into English, is a brilliantly clever, illuminating satire in the tradition of Kurt Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, and George Orwell that offers a visionary, frightening, and all-toofunny glimpse at a near future we may be hurtling toward faster than it's at all comfortable to admit. So why delay any longer? TheShop already knows you're going to love this book. You may as well head to the cash register, crack the covers, and see whythat is for yourself. - (Baker & Taylor)

A U.S. release of an international best-seller imagines a country where a universal ranking system determines its citizens’ statuses, careers and romantic partners, where a machine scrapper becomes the unwitting leader of a band of misfit robots. 40,000 first printing. - (Baker & Taylor)

In the near future sci-fi world of Qualityland, algorithms help create an idyllic life for its citizens, but what if the perfect world wasn't built for you?

Welcome to QualityLand, the best country on Earth. Here, a universal ranking system determines the social advantages and career opportunities of every member of society. An automated matchmaking service knows the best partners for everyone and helps with the break up when your ideal match (frequently) changes. And the foolproof algorithms of the biggest, most successful company in the world, TheShop, know what you want before you do and conveniently deliver to your doorstep before you even order it.

In QualityCity, Peter Jobless is a machine scrapper who can't quite bring himself to destroy the imperfect machines sent his way, and has become the unwitting leader of a band of robotic misfits hidden in his home and workplace. One day, Peter receives a product from TheShop that he absolutely, positively knows he does not want, and which he decides, at great personal cost, to return. The only problem: doing so means proving the perfect algorithm of TheShop wrong, calling into question the very foundations of QualityLand itself.

Qualityland, Marc-Uwe Kling's first book to be translated into English, is a brilliantly clever, illuminating satire in the tradition of Kurt Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, and George Orwell that offers a visionary, frightening, and all-too funny glimpse at a near future we may be hurtling toward faster than it's at all comfortable to admit. So why delay any longer? TheShop already knows you're going to love this book. You may as well head to the cash register, crack the covers, and see why that is for yourself.
- (Grand Central Pub)

Author Biography

Marc-Uwe Kling is a German author and songwriter. Qualityland spent months on the German bestseller lists, has sold more than half a million copies to date internationally, and is currently in production as an HBO series. Kling lives in Berlin. - (Grand Central Pub)

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Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Personalized literature you are guaranteed to like! Combat robots gamers control in actual battle! Personal digital friends—like human friends, only better! Welcome to QualityLand, where everything is superlative, existence is an echo chamber, your surname is determined by the employment of your parents at the moment of conception, and the only button you're allowed to click is OK. Algorithms determine everything about a person's life: whom they date, who their friends are, and what the next exciting delivery from TheShop—"the world's most popular online retailer"—will be. Machine scrapper and ordinary guy Peter Jobless unwittingly upsets this tidy existence by trying to return a product that he doesn't want. Since QualityLand society hinges on the belief that personal profiles can never be incorrect, he is told it's not possible. Awakened to a new purpose, Peter goes on a quest with the help of subversive hackers and a band of misfit robots. Kling's sharp observations target the economy, the law, xenophobia, relationships, security, and government, sparing few and exposing with delightful brutality how close QualityLand is to reality. The dark technological visions of Black Mirror are served up with humor by a worthy successor to Douglas Adams, and it's in development for HBO. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Publishers Weekly Reviews

The latest from Kling (The Kangaroo Chronicles), already in production at HBO, is a hilarious romp through an absurd hypercapitalist dystopia. After the third "crisis of the century" in a decade, a country is renamed QualityLand. There, each person is named after their parents' professions, has a social media feed specially created by a corporation, and is assigned a level from 1 to 100, which dictates what partner someone can match with, what job someone can have, and so on. Peter Jobless is a low-level metal recycling scrapper who, one day, receives a delivery from TheShop that he didn't order—not unusual in itself, as TheShop anticipates all desires (its motto is "We know what you want")—but more importantly, that he doesn't want. Aided by the defective robots living under his shop that he saved from the scrapper, Peter embarks on a journey to return his unwanted delivery. Peter's quest unfolds against the backdrop of a presidential election, where voters can choose between a maximally intelligent, socialist-minded robot programmed for objectivity, and a celebrity right-wing chef, prone to contradicting himself in the same sentence. No need to guess who's leading the polls. Sharp and biting, the most implausible aspect of Kling's novel is the relative note of optimism that ends it. This is spot-on satire. (Jan.)

Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

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